The “School Climate Solution” to Reducing K-12 Workers’ Comp Costs

Posted by William Grace Frost on January 11, 2017 at 11:45 AM

The physical and emotional well-being of employees is of vital importance to the success of K-12 schools, but the challenge of keeping school staff safe from harm is becoming more and more complex. As a result of rising grievances, the costs of Workers’ Compensation (WC) claims are sky rocketing. Rising claims and rising costs are the curse of school administrators who continually look for ways to reduce the probability of injuries happening on their campuses, and it’s also why risk managers embrace the saying – “the best Workers’ Comp claims are the ones that never happen.”

Making Schools Safer: A Relationship Opportunity and a People Solution

Posted by William Grace Frost on February 23, 2016 at 12:00 AM

Creating safer schools is a relationship opportunity that first and foremost, needs a people solution. Adding more surveillance cameras, metal detectors and security guards will help keep the guns and bad guys out, and make schools more “secure”, but the majority of “safety” problems happen within the schools themselves. No amount of beefing up security can stop kids’ prejudices, emotional acting out and peer-to-peer mistreatments from getting through the front doors.

Who Knows About Risk?

Posted by Dorothy Gjerdrum on February 18, 2015 at 10:52 AM

Ten years ago, there was a terrible school shooting in northern Minnesota that left 10 people dead.  Shortly after it occurred, I spoke with a school security expert about the incident.  At the time, we didn’t know anything about why the shootings had occurred and there was a lot of fear and speculation going around.  I asked him if he thought school shootings were predictable (and therefore preventable) or if they were random acts of violence.  To this day, his answer still haunts me.  He said, “Someone always k

Risk is More Than a Four-Letter Word

Posted by Dorothy Gjerdrum on January 23, 2015 at 3:08 PM

When I say “a four-letter word,” you think I’m going to say something bad, don’t you?  For many years, risk management took that same approach.  Risk was something to be avoided, transferred away, segregated and minimized.  We worked hard to minimize the adverse effects of losses and claims, transfer or prevent them when possible and finance them when necessary.  We treated risk like a bad, four-letter word and in some instances, we still do.

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