Virtual Connections: Utilizing Technology to Build Relationships with Injured Workers

Posted by Tammy Bradly on August 7, 2019 at 10:08 AM

As the telemedicine industry continues to boom, we’re seeing more and more new forms of telehealth emerge in the marketplace. Telehealth variations include tele-rehab, remote patient monitoring and even utilization of “avatar-like” nurses by hospital systems and providers. In this new world of telehealth, we need to continually be looking for innovative modes by which triage and telephonic case managers can connect with the individuals they serve and engage them on their road to recovery.

What to Know When Establishing an On-Site Health Center

Posted by Terri Evans on March 26, 2019 at 1:07 PM

OwnRx: The Hidden Pharmacy

Posted by Mark Morgan on March 20, 2019 at 11:03 AM

Once in a blue moon, the U.S. government allows the implementation of a program that affords employers the opportunity to save money without inconveniencing employees. While you process that statement, think of what your current spend is on pharmacy. What just a few years ago was a small percentage of your medical cost may now occupy a higher percentage of the total spend without a cost control method in sight… until now.

Acquisition Cost Index Pricing for Medications

Posted by Mark Morgan on February 4, 2019 at 8:23 PM

Proactive Prescription Programs: Proven Pharmacy Management Practices

Posted by Paul Peak on January 9, 2019 at 9:49 AM

When it comes to helping reducing time away from work following an injury and reducing claim spend, access to the right medications at the right time is crucial while also managing to prevent chronic use of high risk medications.

Drug Formularies: A Growing Trend In Workers’ Compensation

Posted by Ben Roberts on December 17, 2018 at 5:51 PM

Fighting the Opioid Epidemic with Genetic Testing

Posted by Larry Saunders on July 25, 2018 at 9:16 AM

Sometimes the effectiveness of a drug depends on how our bodies process it.  A lot of drugs are inactive until our liver enzymes transform them into an active form. Opioids (Vicodin, Percocet, OxyContin) work in this manner.  Someone whose body has little or no ability to process opioids into their active form receives very little or no pain relief. They are also more likely to take a higher dose than was prescribed in their quest for pain management.