Privatizing Government Services

Posted by Joseph T. Caufield on April 26, 2016 at 9:03 AM

Local governments often benefit from private and public partnerships formed around special projects and routine services. For example, public entities often work with national organizations such as the Nature Conservancy or a local conservation trust to obtain land for parks or nature preserves. Additionally, many local governments entrust the operations of wastewater treatment and refuse collection to private sector service providers.

Emerging Risks: “Tell me what I don’t know”

Posted by Chris Mandel on April 19, 2016 at 10:47 AM

A CEO I once worked for used to say quite regularly, “tell me what I don’t know.” His view was he could read the Wall Street Journal or any number of other typical sources of intelligence and information about running organizations, just like me as his senior risk leader. What he was most concerned about, as are most CEOs, board members and other key risk stakeholders, were the things once described by Donald Rumsfeld in 2002 (Secretary of Defense from 2001 to 2006) right after 911. That is:

Preventing Sexual Abuse in Organizations by Angelique Dale from Praesidium

Posted by Angelique Dale on April 18, 2016 at 11:46 AM

Areas of Reform and Jail Operations: Times Are Changing

Posted by Richard Bishop on April 12, 2016 at 10:23 AM

Historically, our high dollar jail exposure has dealt with in-custody death, lack of adequate medical treatment, strip searches, assault and conditions of confinement (traditionally referred to as overcrowding). Coming soon to a jail near you are some new players: adequate treatment of the mentally ill, solitary confinement and a new way the courts are looking at use of force in jails.

Workplace Violence and Active Shooter Prevention with Chris Grollnek

Posted by Chris Grollnek on April 5, 2016 at 12:32 PM

Active Shooter Prevention for Public Entities

Posted by Chris Grollnek on April 5, 2016 at 11:31 AM

Active shooter prevention for public entities and corporations is a relatively new training concept, but a reality that risk managers can no longer ignore. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there has been an uptick in violent incidents occurring in the work environment, from 65% to 73%. Therefore, training must be comprehensive, encompassing all areas of daily operations and should translate into an opportunity for organizations, by turning a “squeamish” subject into a benefit with a possible return on investment (ROI).

Disaster Management: Planning for Disasters

Posted by Dan Hurley on March 29, 2016 at 1:20 PM

We all know that disasters can come in all sizes and levels of severity, and each may be unique depending on your entity's location and function. While in a public school district, one of our most serious disasters involved a nor’easter over a veteran's day weekend. The storm ripped off a large portion of the school's northwest roof saturating and exposing several classrooms, and indirectly flooding all rooms on both floors. In another event on a much smaller scale, an incompatible metal plug in a middle school's boiler room on a pressurized line, released water over a three-day weekend.

How To Implement a Successful Enterprise Risk Management Program with Shannon Gunderman

Posted by Shannon Gunderman on March 22, 2016 at 3:37 PM

Preventing Sexual Abuse in Organizations Starts with the Screening Process

Posted by Angelique Dale on March 22, 2016 at 9:59 AM

“The employee had a clean criminal background check.” This is often a school’s statement following an allegation of abuse. However, statistics show that even the most egregious predators do not have criminal histories (only 4% – 5% do); and as recently highlighted in this month’s USA Today exposé, teachers who lose teaching licenses in one state often get a teaching job in another state because there isn’t a national teacher disciplinary tracking system.

Doing the "Right Thing" for the Claimant is Also the Most Cost-Effective

Posted by Fernando Branco on March 15, 2016 at 11:17 AM

Without a clear clinical picture, treatment decisions for workers' compensation cases are often difficult. Surgeries, spinal interventions, opioids, stimulators, or intrathecal pumps are not always the best approaches. They may cause physical deterioration and drastically increase our expenses. Here are some suggested alternatives:

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