Elected Officials and Risk Management

Posted by Roger Neal on July 12, 2016 at 12:00 AM

Virtually all public entities have an elected board of directors, council or commissioners who enact the policies that the agency uses daily. Unfortunately, only a few elected officials think of risk management when making decisions. And when they do, it is usually after there has been a loss or when they have to pay their insurance premium. In fact, many think that their decisions only apply to a single department, not the entire organization.

Terrorism: A Very Broad Exposure

Posted by Jessica and Joey on June 28, 2016 at 9:29 AM

With tragedies striking almost daily, it is important to think about how your community would respond. Who would help you manage a major disaster? How could something of that magnitude affect your entity’s bottom line? What insurance policies, protocols, and plans will you need to respond effectively? For risk management professionals, these are pertinent questions on how their public entity would react in the event of a crisis.

Things I Have Learned About Risk Management and Safety

Posted by Jennifer Mannix on May 31, 2016 at 9:28 AM

I am fairly new to risk management – just started in this position 2 ½ years ago – but I am not new to the public sector. I have been working for the City & Borough of Juneau, Alaska for most of my adult life, more than 25 years. My previous experience with our risk manager was limited to review of contract insurance terms. I felt very confident in that area, so how much more could there be?

Your Mobile Workforce is Driving Up Your Exposure

Posted by Matt McDonough on May 17, 2016 at 9:22 AM

According to the National Safety Council’s Injury Facts 2016, the top three causes of fatalities on the road are drunk driving, speeding and distracted driving. It is estimated that distracted driving accounts for approximately 26% of those deaths, while drunk driving is the top cause and accounts for roughly 31% of road fatalities. It is certainly reasonable to think that distracted driving could be higher.

"Practicing" Integrity

Posted by Stuart Brody on May 10, 2016 at 7:39 AM

Do you have integrity? Of course you do. Everyone has integrity. Have you ever met anyone who doesn’t believe he or she “has integrity”?

So, here’s the question: if everyone possesses integrity, why do we see all around us evidence of integrity breaches – in business, sports, academia, even in the clergy and certainly in our world of government?

Distracted Driving and Obstructions to Safe Law Enforcement Driving

Posted by Julie Frisbey Decker on May 3, 2016 at 9:48 AM

In order for a police officer to arrive safely at a call, he or she must be able to drive without obstructions and distractions, which can be very difficult in today’s environment. When driving, police officers often need to use radios and Mobile Data Terminals (MDTs) or computers while operating emergency lights and sirens, not to mention the simultaneous use of cell phones.

Privatizing Government Services

Posted by Joseph T. Caufield on April 26, 2016 at 9:03 AM

Local governments often benefit from private and public partnerships formed around special projects and routine services. For example, public entities often work with national organizations such as the Nature Conservancy or a local conservation trust to obtain land for parks or nature preserves. Additionally, many local governments entrust the operations of wastewater treatment and refuse collection to private sector service providers.

Emerging Risks: “Tell me what I don’t know”

Posted by Chris Mandel on April 19, 2016 at 10:47 AM

A CEO I once worked for used to say quite regularly, “tell me what I don’t know.” His view was he could read the Wall Street Journal or any number of other typical sources of intelligence and information about running organizations, just like me as his senior risk leader. What he was most concerned about, as are most CEOs, board members and other key risk stakeholders, were the things once described by Donald Rumsfeld in 2002 (Secretary of Defense from 2001 to 2006) right after 911. That is:

Preventing Sexual Abuse in Organizations by Angelique Dale from Praesidium

Posted by Angelique Dale on April 18, 2016 at 11:46 AM

Areas of Reform and Jail Operations: Times Are Changing

Posted by Richard Bishop on April 12, 2016 at 10:23 AM

Historically, our high dollar jail exposure has dealt with in-custody death, lack of adequate medical treatment, strip searches, assault and conditions of confinement (traditionally referred to as overcrowding). Coming soon to a jail near you are some new players: adequate treatment of the mentally ill, solitary confinement and a new way the courts are looking at use of force in jails.

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